Bunions
Bunions
(also known as “Hallux
Abducto Valgus”)




Description
Bunions are bony bumps that form on the side of the big toe joint or baby toe joint (these are commonly called “bunionettes” or “tailor’s bunions”). Bunions most commonly result from one or more of the following factors: genetics, faulty foot mechanics like over-pronation, and/or long periods of time spent in improperly fitting footwear. Bunions can start with
audible clicking (called ‘crepitus’) and/or stiffness in the affected joint which indicates that the joint surfaces are rubbing together improperly. This may progress to include inflammation, degeneration of the surfaces of the joint, deformity (including bone growth at the joint line and displacement of the toe) and ultimately, loss of range of motion in the joint.
Symptoms
  • Audible clicking (called ‘crepitus’) and/or stiffness in the affected joint which indicates that the joint surfaces are rubbing together improperly.
  • Inflammation, degeneration of the surfaces of the joint, deformity (including bone growth at the joint line and displacement of the toe) and ultimately, loss of range of motion in the joint.
  • Pain at the side and top of the joint that worsens with walking and physical activity.
Pedorthic Management
  • Custom orthoses or over-the-counter insoles to aid big toe joint function, help control over-pronation and maintain proper alignment of the bones in the feet.
  • Properly sized, supportive footwear that are torsionally stable (can’t be folded or twisted easily) and that feature a good “rocker profile” (curved from the ball to tips of the toes) help to reduce stress on the joint when walking.
  • Footwear modifications to expand the area of the shoe surrounding the bunion to relieve pressure.
Other Treatments
  • Physical therapy modalities include rest, icing and massage.
  • Injections, surgery and other treatment options - please consult your medical doctor for information and/or referral to a podiatrist or other foot and ankle specialist.